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Difference between revisions of "World SCRABBLE Championship"

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The '''World SCRABBLE'''®''' Championship''' ('''WSC''') is
+
The '''World SCRABBLE'''®''' Championship''' ('''WSC''') was
 
the world’s top international [[SCRABBLE]] championship  
 
the world’s top international [[SCRABBLE]] championship  
tournament, and has been held since 1991.
+
tournament. Although it ceased to be held under this name in 2011,
 +
this page also lists its successor events, which continue to fill the
 +
same role within the global competitive SCRABBLE community.
  
It is currently sponsored solely by [[Mattel]], Inc.
+
The tournament rules and word list for current events are set
The tournament rules and word list are set
 
 
by the [[World English-Language Scrabble Players' Association]] (WESPA).
 
by the [[World English-Language Scrabble Players' Association]] (WESPA).
The involvement of [[NASPA]] is limited to selecting the American and Canadian teams
+
The direct involvement of [[NASPA]] is limited to selecting the American and Canadian teams.
and to the participation of Copresident [[John Chew]] as event director.
 
  
 
For more information about the next event, see  
 
For more information about the next event, see  
[[2014 World SCRABBLE Championship]].
+
[[2019 WESPA Championship]].
  
 
== History ==
 
== History ==
Line 18: Line 18:
 
American [[Brian Cappelletto]] in a best-of-three finals.
 
American [[Brian Cappelletto]] in a best-of-three finals.
  
Until 2003, the WSC was then organized and sponsored in biennial alternation by [[Hasbro]] and [[Mattel]],
+
Two years later in 1993, the [[National SCRABBLE Association]] under [[John D. Williams, Jr.]] organized the next event, sponsored by [[Hasbro]] and directed by [[Michael R. Wise]] in New York City.
during which period Americans and Canadians won two more titles each, and England
+
It was won by [[Mark Nyman]] of England.
and Thailand one each.
+
 
 +
From then until 2003, the WSC was organized and sponsored in biennial alternation by [[Hasbro]] and [[Mattel]],
 +
during which period Americans and Canadians won two more titles each, and
 +
and Thailand one.
  
 
From 2005 to 2011, the event was organized and sponsored by Nelkon and Mattel.  
 
From 2005 to 2011, the event was organized and sponsored by Nelkon and Mattel.  
  
In 2013, Mattel licensed [[Mind Sports International]] (MSI) to hold the
+
In 2013 and 2014, Mattel licensed [[Mind Sports International]] (MSI) to hold an open
 
[[2013 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament|2013 World SCRABBLE Championship]]  
 
[[2013 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament|2013 World SCRABBLE Championship]]  
in place of the WSC.
+
in place of the traditionally invitational WSC.
  
In 2014, [[MSI]] announced that it would be holding its
+
In 2015, Mattel withdrew support for the SCRABBLE Champions Tournament, and
[[Mind Sports International World Championship|2014 World SCRABBLE Championship]] in London.
+
[[WESPA]] staged instead their first WESPA Championship, returning to the
 +
invitational format.
 +
 
 +
In 2016, MSI held the “MSI World Championships”.
 +
 
 +
In 2017, both MSI and Mattel staged events.
 +
 
 +
In 2018, TMA International (formerly known as DB Subscriptions Ltd), doing business as Mindsports Academy, staged the “Mattel World Scrabble Championships”.
 +
 
 +
== [[2014 World SCRABBLE Championship|2014 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament]] ==
 +
 
 +
{|
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Date
 +
|November 19–23
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Place
 +
|ExCeL London Exhibition and Convention Centre, London, England
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner
 +
|[[Craig Beevers]] (Eng)
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Runner-Up
 +
|[[Chris Lipe]] (USA)
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winning Teams
 +
|Sri Lanka (singleton), Canada (multiplayer)
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner’s Prize
 +
|£3,000
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Prize Pool
 +
|£7,000
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Players
 +
|108
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|National Teams
 +
|32
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Format
 +
|24 rounds followed by best-of-3 quarterfinals, best-of-5 semifinals and best-of-5 finals
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Sponsor
 +
|[[Mattel]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Organizer
 +
|[[MSI]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Director
 +
|[[John Chew]]
 +
|}
 +
 
 +
* This was the first event held in an even-numbered year.
 +
* This was the first event to feature quarterfinals.
  
 
== [[2013 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament]] ==
 
== [[2013 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament]] ==
Line 127: Line 184:
 
|-
 
|-
 
!align=right|Director
 
!align=right|Director
|[[John Chew]]
+
|[[Wilma Vialle]]
 
|}
 
|}
  
 
* Nigel Richards became the first two-time champion.
 
* Nigel Richards became the first two-time champion.
 
* In Round 7, [[Edward Martin]] and [[Chollapat Itthi-Aree]] discovered that a “G” tile was missing from their game.  The incident was widely reported in the news media, but the tile was eventually found later on in the event under innocuous circumstances.
 
* In Round 7, [[Edward Martin]] and [[Chollapat Itthi-Aree]] discovered that a “G” tile was missing from their game.  The incident was widely reported in the news media, but the tile was eventually found later on in the event under innocuous circumstances.
 +
* First event to be held under [[WESPA]] rules (Version 2)
 +
 +
== [[2009 World SCRABBLE Championship]] ==
 +
 +
[[File:2009-wsc-champ.jpg|320px|photo of 2009 WSC champion]]
 +
 +
{|
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Date
 +
|November 26–29
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Place
 +
|Zon Regency Hotel, Johor Bahru, Malaysia
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner
 +
|[[Pakorn Nemitrmansuk]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Runner-Up
 +
|[[Nigel Richards]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winning Teams<br>(mean team member rank)
 +
|India (singleton), Thailand (multiplayer)
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner’s Prize
 +
|$15,000
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Prize Pool
 +
|$30,500
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Players
 +
|108
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|National Teams
 +
|39
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Format
 +
|24 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Sponsor
 +
|[[Mattel]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Organizer
 +
|[[Philip Nelkon]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Director
 +
|[[Wilma Vialle]]
 +
|}
  
== 2009 ==
+
* First event to be held under [[WESPA]] rules (Version 1)
  
* Information to follow
+
== [[2007 World SCRABBLE Championship]] ==
  
== 2007 ==
+
[[File:2007-wsc-champ.jpg|320px|photo of 2007 WSC champion]]
  
* Information to follow
+
{|
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Date
 +
|November 9&ndash;12
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Place
 +
|Taj President Hotel, Mumbai, India
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner
 +
|[[Nigel Richards]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Runner-Up
 +
|[[Ganesh Asirvatham]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winning Teams<br>(mean team member rank)
 +
|U.A.E. (singleton), Malaysia (multiplayer)
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner’s Prize
 +
|$15,000
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Prize Pool
 +
|$30,500
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Players
 +
|104
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|National Teams
 +
|38
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Format
 +
|24 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Sponsor
 +
|[[Mattel]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Organizer
 +
|[[Philip Nelkon]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Director
 +
|[[Wilma Vialle]]
 +
|}
  
== 2005 ==
+
== [[2005 World SCRABBLE Championship]] ==
  
* Information to follow
+
{|
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Date
 +
|November 16&ndash;20
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Place
 +
|Marriott Regent’s Park, London, England
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner
 +
|[[Adam Logan]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Runner-Up
 +
|[[Pakorn Nemitrmansuk]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winning Teams<br>(mean team member rank)
 +
|Qatar (singleton), Australia (multiplayer)
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Winner’s Prize
 +
|$15,000
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Prize Pool
 +
|$30,500
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Players
 +
|102
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|National Teams
 +
|39
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Format
 +
|24 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Sponsor
 +
|[[Mattel]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Organizer
 +
|[[Philip Nelkon]]
 +
|-
 +
!align=right|Director
 +
|[[Wilma Vialle]]
 +
|}
  
 
== 2003 ==
 
== 2003 ==

Latest revision as of 15:08, 14 August 2019

The World SCRABBLE® Championship (WSC) was the world’s top international SCRABBLE championship tournament. Although it ceased to be held under this name in 2011, this page also lists its successor events, which continue to fill the same role within the global competitive SCRABBLE community.

The tournament rules and word list for current events are set by the World English-Language Scrabble Players' Association (WESPA). The direct involvement of NASPA is limited to selecting the American and Canadian teams.

For more information about the next event, see 2019 WESPA Championship.

History

The first WSC was organized by Philip Nelkon of Mattel in London in 1991 and won by Peter Morris, a Canadian residing in the United States, who defeated American Brian Cappelletto in a best-of-three finals.

Two years later in 1993, the National SCRABBLE Association under John D. Williams, Jr. organized the next event, sponsored by Hasbro and directed by Michael R. Wise in New York City. It was won by Mark Nyman of England.

From then until 2003, the WSC was organized and sponsored in biennial alternation by Hasbro and Mattel, during which period Americans and Canadians won two more titles each, and and Thailand one.

From 2005 to 2011, the event was organized and sponsored by Nelkon and Mattel.

In 2013 and 2014, Mattel licensed Mind Sports International (MSI) to hold an open 2013 World SCRABBLE Championship in place of the traditionally invitational WSC.

In 2015, Mattel withdrew support for the SCRABBLE Champions Tournament, and WESPA staged instead their first WESPA Championship, returning to the invitational format.

In 2016, MSI held the “MSI World Championships”.

In 2017, both MSI and Mattel staged events.

In 2018, TMA International (formerly known as DB Subscriptions Ltd), doing business as Mindsports Academy, staged the “Mattel World Scrabble Championships”.

2014 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament

Date November 19–23
Place ExCeL London Exhibition and Convention Centre, London, England
Winner Craig Beevers (Eng)
Runner-Up Chris Lipe (USA)
Winning Teams Sri Lanka (singleton), Canada (multiplayer)
Winner’s Prize £3,000
Prize Pool £7,000
Players 108
National Teams 32
Format 24 rounds followed by best-of-3 quarterfinals, best-of-5 semifinals and best-of-5 finals
Sponsor Mattel
Organizer MSI
Director John Chew
  • This was the first event held in an even-numbered year.
  • This was the first event to feature quarterfinals.

2013 SCRABBLE Champions Tournament

photo of 2013 WSC champion

Date December 4–8
Place andel’s Hotel, Prague, Czech Republic
Winner Nigel Richards (NZL)
Runner-Up Komol Panyasophonlert (THA)
Winning Teams Israel (singleton), Australia (multiplayer)
Winner’s Prize $10,000
Prize Pool $22,500
Players 110
National Teams 38
Format 31 rounds followed by best-of-5 semifinals and best-of-5 finals
Sponsor Mattel
Organizer MSI
Director John Chew
  • Nigel Richards became the first player to win the title for a third time.
  • Nigel Richards became the first champion to successfully defend the title.
  • This was the first event in this series organized by MSI.
  • This was the first event in this series to be called the SCRABBLE Champions Tournament.
  • This was the first event in this series to include a Last Chance Qualifier.
  • This was the first event in this series to include official side events: Clabbers, Duplicate, Speed, three Opens, Czech, German, Norwegian and Polish.

2011 World SCRABBLE Championship

photo of 2011 WSC champion

Date October 11–16
Place Hilton Hotel, Warsaw, Poland
Winner Nigel Richards
Runner-Up Andrew Fisher
Winning Team Northern Ireland
Winner’s Prize $20,000
Prize Pool $50,000
Players 106
National Teams 39
Format 34 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
Sponsor Mattel
Organizer Philip Nelkon
Director Wilma Vialle
  • Nigel Richards became the first two-time champion.
  • In Round 7, Edward Martin and Chollapat Itthi-Aree discovered that a “G” tile was missing from their game. The incident was widely reported in the news media, but the tile was eventually found later on in the event under innocuous circumstances.
  • First event to be held under WESPA rules (Version 2)

2009 World SCRABBLE Championship

photo of 2009 WSC champion

Date November 26–29
Place Zon Regency Hotel, Johor Bahru, Malaysia
Winner Pakorn Nemitrmansuk
Runner-Up Nigel Richards
Winning Teams
(mean team member rank)
India (singleton), Thailand (multiplayer)
Winner’s Prize $15,000
Prize Pool $30,500
Players 108
National Teams 39
Format 24 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
Sponsor Mattel
Organizer Philip Nelkon
Director Wilma Vialle
  • First event to be held under WESPA rules (Version 1)

2007 World SCRABBLE Championship

photo of 2007 WSC champion

Date November 9–12
Place Taj President Hotel, Mumbai, India
Winner Nigel Richards
Runner-Up Ganesh Asirvatham
Winning Teams
(mean team member rank)
U.A.E. (singleton), Malaysia (multiplayer)
Winner’s Prize $15,000
Prize Pool $30,500
Players 104
National Teams 38
Format 24 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
Sponsor Mattel
Organizer Philip Nelkon
Director Wilma Vialle

2005 World SCRABBLE Championship

Date November 16–20
Place Marriott Regent’s Park, London, England
Winner Adam Logan
Runner-Up Pakorn Nemitrmansuk
Winning Teams
(mean team member rank)
Qatar (singleton), Australia (multiplayer)
Winner’s Prize $15,000
Prize Pool $30,500
Players 102
National Teams 39
Format 24 rounds followed by best-of-5 finals
Sponsor Mattel
Organizer Philip Nelkon
Director Wilma Vialle

2003

  • Information to follow

2001

  • Information to follow

1999

  • Information to follow

1997

  • Information to follow

1995

  • Information to follow

1993

  • Information to follow

1991

  • Information to follow